Author Archives: Liz

Breaking Boxes

I love words. I really, really love words. I like poetry, and reading, and writing, and conversations, and songs with words in, and puns and wordplay and anagrams. I like learning words in different languages, and finding out where words … Continue reading

Posted in complexity | 7 Comments

How do you terminate a project in your org?

We all know that when we do something new, for the first time, we make discoveries; and all software projects (and in fact change efforts of any variety) target something new. (You can find out what that is by asking, … Continue reading

Posted in business value, capability red, deliberate discovery, real options | 1 Comment

On Learning and Information

This has been an interesting year for me. At the end of March I came out of one of the largest Agile transformations ever attempted (still going, surprisingly well), and learned way more than I ever thought possible about how … Continue reading

Posted in learning models, scale, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Correlated in Retrospect

A few ¬†years back, I went to visit a company that had managed to achieve a high level of agility without high levels of coaching or training, shipping several times a day. I was curious as to how they had … Continue reading

Posted in complexity, cynefin | 3 Comments

BDD: A Three-Headed Monster

Back in Greek mythology, there was a dog called Cerberus. It guarded the gate to the underworld, and it had three heads. There was a great guy called Heracles (Hercules in Latin) who was a demi-god, which means he would … Continue reading

Posted in bdd, deliberate discovery, stories, testing | 3 Comments

Capabilities and Learning Outcomes

When I started training, I taught topics. Lots of topics! Nowadays, thanks to some help from Marian Willeke and her incredible understanding of how adults learn, I get to teach capabilities instead. It’s much more fun. This is how I … Continue reading

Posted in bdd, learning models | 2 Comments

On Epiphany and Apophany

We probe, then sense, then respond. If you’re familiar with Cynefin, you know that we categorize the obvious, analyze the complicated, probe the complex and act in chaos. You might also know that those approaches to the different domains come … Continue reading

Posted in cynefin, real options, uncertainty | 6 Comments